Search
Search type

School of Social Sciences

Student in a lecture
BSocSc Sociology
Learn to critically analyse and interpret societies and gain skills for a variety of careers.

BSocSc Sociology

Year of entry: 2018

Overview

Degree awarded
BSocSc
Duration
3 years
Typical A-level offer
ABB
Typical International Baccalaureate offer

6,5,5 at Higher level, 33 points overall.  Applicants offering Mathematics or Maths Methods at standard or higher level must achieve a minimum of grade 5.

 Applicants not holding GCSE English Language or equivalent must achieve grade 5 in standard or higher level English. 

Full entry requirements

Number of places/applicants

In 2017 there were 496 applications for 63 places for this degree.

How to apply
Apply through UCAS .

Course overview

  • Do you want to be part of one of the largest and most reputable groups of sociologists currently working in the UK?
  • Would you like to develop the skills to analyse and interpret today's social developments and problems?
  • Do you fancy learning research skills that will allow you to carry out your own sociological investigations?
  • Would you like to study abroad for a semester in your second year?
  • Take the right course units and you can apply for a paid summer internship through Manchester's Q-Step programme.
Loading
Madeleine tells us why she chose to study Sociology

Open days

  • Find out more and register for an Open Day

Post-offer visits

If you are made an offer we will email you an invitation to visit us late January, February or early March. These afternoons are organised by the School of Social Sciences and include a tour, a talk, refreshments and a chance to talk to students, lecturers and recruitment staff.

If you are visiting Manchester and would like to visit our admissions office please make an appointment in advance. (Call +44 (0)161 275 4470/1473 or email socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk )

Fees

Tuition fees for home/EU students commencing their studies in September 2018 will be £9,250. Future inflationary increases may also be applied to each subsequent year of your course, subject to government regulations on fee increases. Tuition fees for international students will be £18,000 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Scholarships/sponsorships

Scholarships and bursaries are available to eligible Home/EU students, including the Manchester Bursary . This bursary is in addition to the government package of maintenance grants.

Contact details

Academic department
School of Social Sciences
Contact name
Social Sciences Undergraduate Admissions.
Telephone
+44 (0)161 275 1473
Facsimile
+44 (0)161 275 4751
Email
Website
http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/
Academic department overview

Compare this course

Entry requirements

A-level

  • ABB
  • We do not accept two A/S Levels grades in place of one A Level.
  • Applicants must be studying at least one of the following A Level subjects: Accounting; Economics; Finance; Business Studies; Development Studies; Government and Politics; Economic and Social History; Mathematics; Anthropology; Sociology; Philosophy; Religious Studies; English Language; English Literature; Geography; Psychology; Classical Civilisation; History; Archaeology; Communication Studies; Environmental Studies; World Development; Biology; Chemistry; Physics; Modern Languages.
  • General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted for entry.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit grade information which, like all other available information, will inform the consideration of applications.  Unit grades will not normally form part of offer conditions, except for Mathematics programmes.

GCSE

Minimum grade C in English Language and grade C in Mathematics. In the newly reformed GCSEs in England you will require a grade 5 in English Language and grade 5 in Mathematics.

International Baccalaureate

6,5,5 at Higher level, 33 points overall.  Applicants offering Mathematics or Maths Methods at standard or higher level must achieve a minimum of grade 5.

 Applicants not holding GCSE English Language or equivalent must achieve grade 5 in standard or higher level English. 

Irish Leaving Certificate

H1, H1, H2, H2.

Scottish requirements

AAABB in Scottish Highers.  Applicants taking a combination of Highers and Advanced Highers should contact  socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk    Applicants not taking English Language or Mathematics at Higher level must achieve grade C in English Language and Grade B in mathematics at SCQF Level 5.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The Welsh Baccalaureate is accepted as equivalent to an A-level on a grade-for-grade basis.

European Baccalaureate

Applicants studying the European Baccalaureate are expected to achieve 77% overall and no lower than 80% in English.

Other international entry requirements

Pearson BTEC qualifications

The School accepts Pearson BTEC qualifications for entry as long as it is in a relevant subject and taken alongside A-levels.

National Extended Diploma - accepted with grades MMM, alongside an A-level at grade A in a different subject area to the diploma.

National Diploma - accepted with grades MP, alongside two A-levels at grades AB in different subject areas to the diploma.

Foundation Diploma - accepted with grade M, alongside two A-levels at grades AB in different subject areas to the diploma.

Subsidiary Diploma - accepted with grade D, alongside two A-levels at grade AB in different subject areas to the diploma.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

The School accepts OCR Cambridge Technicals (CTEC) Level 3 qualifications for entry as long as it is in a relevant subject and are offered along with A levels.

Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma- accepted with grades MMM, alongside an A level at grade A in a different subject area to the diploma.

Cambridge Technical Diploma - accepted with grades MM, alongside an A level at grade A in a different subject area to the diploma.

Cambridge Foundation Diploma - accepted with grades MM, alongside an A level at grade A in a different subject area to the diploma.

Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate - accepted with grades M, alongside two A levels at grades AB in different subject areas.

Access to HE Diploma

  • Typical applicant - A mature student returning to education after a number of years.
  • Typical offer - Pass Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits (36 distinctions / 9 merits).
  • `Pass' in Level 2 English and Mathematics.

Contact: Tom McCunnie tom.mccunnie@manchester.ac.uk

Cambridge Pre-U

Applicants are expected to achieve D3, M1,M1 - M1, M1, M1 in the Cambridge Pre-U. Applicants can either take three Pre-U qualifications or study them in conjunction with A Level subjects.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. Although the Extended Project will not be included in the conditions of your offer, we strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. A number of our academic Schools may also choose to take your performance in the EPQ into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Home-schooled applicants

If you have followed a non-standard educational route (eg home educated) we will consider your application against the standard entry criteria for the course to which you apply.

You must also provide a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education.

English language

All applicants are expected to have a minimum of grade C in GCSE English Language or equivalent. For international students equivalent qualifications would be:
  • IELTS of 6.5 overall with no lower than 6 in any component.
  • TOEFL (IBT) 92 overall with minimum of 21 in listening and speaking, 22 in reading and 23 in speaking.
  • iGCSE English (First Language) grade C
  • iGCSE English (Second Language) grade B
If you have other English language qualifications and want to find out if they would be acceptable, please email socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk .

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Apply through UCAS .

Advice to applicants

Potential candidates are expected to demonstrate why they have chosen this particular degree in their personal statement and express why the course interests them.

Applicants submitting mitigating circumstances

If you are submitting information about mitigating circumstances that have affected, or are likely to affect, your academic performance, you should include this in the referee's report.

We cannot usually take into account information that is supplied after an adverse decision has been made on an application by the admitting school.

(Examples of mitigating circumstances include family illness, problems with school facilities or an unusual curriculum followed by your school of college.)

How your application is considered

Applications are considered on the basis of an assessment of past and predicted academic achievements, the academic reference and personal statement.

Interview requirements

We do not interview.

Returning to education

We welcome applications from anyone who is returning to education.

Contact: Tom McCunnie tom.mccunnie@manchester.ac.uk

Overseas (non-UK) applicants

Applicants classed as international students who are studying Foundation Year Programmes, will be considered on the basis they have completed their High School education in full. Please see our list of approved UK foundation programmes and entry requirements  for more information. We also accept a number of qualifications from around the globe. For further information please see our country-specific information pages. If you still need help please email us  socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk .

Deferrals

Applications for deferred entry are considered equally to other applications up to the point of confirmation. Deferred entry is granted on the discretion of admissions staff, and is normally granted for one year only.

NB Some English Language test results, such as IELTS of TOEFL, are only valid from two years from the test date.

Policy for applicants who resit their qualifications

We consider applicants who are resitting.

Contact: socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you can apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.

In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved. We may refer back to previous applications or registrations at the University.

If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should include additional evidence of your suitability for the course.

If you are applying through clearing you will need to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing places will be subject to availability.

Course details

Course description

  • Do you want to be part of one of the largest and most reputable groups of sociologists currently working in the UK?
  • Would you like to develop the skills to analyse and interpret today's social developments and problems?
  • Do you fancy learning research skills that will allow you to carry out your own sociological investigations?
  • Would you like to study abroad for a semester in your second year?
  • Take the right course units and you can apply for a paid summer internship through Manchester's Q-Step programme .

Sociology is the study of social life and social change - a domain with huge scope that Zygmunt Bauman describes as any aspect of the world 'that bears the imprint of human activity'.

This can lead the sociologist to many different topics of study from reproduction of inequalities in relation to social categories (eg race, class or gender), to the shaping of intimate relationships by wider cultural contexts, or the generation of resistance and protest by economic trends and crises.

The degree in Sociology engages you in research and writing on a range of sociological topics.

When you study these areas you will be looking at patterns of individual and group behaviour, the rules and norms that govern that behaviour in different societies and the meanings that people attribute to their own life circumstances, their social identities and their relationships.

You will learn and use a range of theories and concepts to help understand topics of interest, and a set of rigorous and systematic approaches to gathering and interpreting information to help you develop reliable knowledge.

When you study sociology at The University of Manchester you encounter course units examining the latest sociological puzzles through up-to-date theories and methods.

You will be given a thorough grounding in a wide range of classic and contemporary theoretical approaches as well as a set of research skills that allow you to carry out your own sociological investigations.

Each year you will be asked to select from a wide range of course units. We can guide you to select options that fit your developing intellectual interests - but by the third year most of our students know exactly what type of sociologist they are.

Special features

  • Our teaching received a 93% satisfaction rating from our students.
  • Our Sociology department was ranked top in the country for research. 'Excellence' in research feeds into teaching so that students are taught by experts with a real passion for their subject.
  • As part of Manchester's Q-Step centre, Sociology offers exciting paid internship opportunities for students.
  • Sociology at Manchester gives you guidance on study skills and employability throughout your degree through the 'Professional Development for Sociologists' (PRoD) programme. It has a successful peer mentoring scheme and student society.

Our students

Sociology students in figures (2014):

  • Students on the course came from 6 countries
  • Their ages ranged from 17 - 51
  • The male / female ratio was 22 : 78

Meet our students

Teaching and learning

Most course units feature formal lectures supported by smaller tutorials or seminars, in which you will be able to explore the contents of lectures and recommended reading in greater depth.

Tutorials and seminars are also key elements in improving your written and oral communication skills through group discussions, essay-writing and presentations.

Students are assigned an Academic Advisor, an academic member of staff who takes a friendly interest in your progress and can advise you on selecting course units and career opportunities.

Coursework and assessment

The assessment in most Sociology course units is a combination of exams and assessed coursework such as essays.

  • First year course units: examination supported with non-assessed essays, used to give you feedback on your progress.
  • Second and final year course units: a combination of coursework and examination.

The way that you study and are assessed will depend on which units you choose. The range of methods is carefully designed to promote in-depth learning and understanding.

  • Essays, coursework and other mid-term evaluations allow fuller development of and feedback on students' knowledge and understanding
  • Coursework, essays and dissertations promote the development of argument and fuller understanding of academic material and test the extent to which students can carry out work independently
  • Presentations and group projects promote teamwork and develop your communication skills.

Course content for year 1

This is a foundation year, compromising of two core areas, classical and contemporary social theory, and research methods. Students will acquire the basic conceptual resources for tackling substantive and theoretical issues in their second and third years of the degree.

You will study 120 credits of courses.

Compulsory

  • Researching Culture and Society
  • From Modernity to Postmodernity I
  • From Modernity to Postmodernity II

Optional (at least two of these):

  • Media, Self & Imagined Community
  • Media, Culture and Society
  • Sociology of Personal Life
  • British Society in a Globalising World
  • Work, Organisations and Society

You can also choose another optional unit or take 20 credits of free choice courses.

Free choice units

Go beyond the boundaries of your degree with University College for Interdisciplinary Learning

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Foundations of Social Thought SOCY10421 20 Mandatory
Contemporary Social Thought SOCY10432 20 Mandatory
Researching Culture and Society SOCY10440 20 Mandatory
British Society in a Globalising World SOCY10401 20 Optional
Media, Culture & Society SOCY10441 20 Optional
Global Social Challenges SOCY10462 20 Optional
Sociology of Personal Life SOCY10471 20 Optional
Work, Organisations and Society SOCY10912 20 Optional

Course content for year 2

In the  second year  you build on your previous courses but can also begin to specialise in certain areas if you wish. There are compulsory research methods courses in qualitative methods and survey research, but all other courses are optional. In the Research Methods modules you will develop skills such as interviewing, analysis of documents, ethnography, and secondary survey analysis.

The aim is to enable you to conduct independent research and to prepare you for your third year dissertation. In addition, Sociology normally offers about ten optional course units in Year Two, from which you can choose up to four. The course units cover a range of perspectives and issues, for example gender and sexuality, racism and ethnicity, globalisation, new media, popular music, sustainability and consumption, the environment, and work and the economy.

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Qualitative Research Design & Methods SOCY20091 20 Mandatory
The Survey Method in Social Research SOST20012 20 Mandatory
Sociology of Popular Music SOCY20012 20 Optional
Sociology of Nature, Environment and Risk SOCY20022 20 Optional
Work, Economy and Society SOCY20031 20 Optional
Social Network Analysis SOCY20041 20 Optional
Education and Society SOCY20052 20 Optional
Sociology of Science SOCY20081 20 Optional
Sustainability, Consumption & Global Responsibilities SOCY20232 20 Optional
New Media SOCY20241 20 Optional
Global Migration SOCY20271 20 Optional
Social Change in China SOCY20281 20 Optional
Self and Society SOCY20402 20 Optional
Gender, Sexuality and Culture SOCY20891 20 Optional
Racism and Ethnicity in the UK SOCY20962 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 15 course units for year 2

Course content for year 3

In your final year you can choose from a wide range of units which reflect the current research of our staff, including urban sociology, protest and social movements, the family, multicultural Britain, debates in social theory, and human-animal relations.

You'll also undertake a dissertation, based upon independent empirical research or theoretical work. You are encouraged to select your own topic and are provided with supervision from a lecturer.

The aim is to build on the research methods training of the previous two years and enable you to acquire some experience in designing and carrying out your own research.

Course units for year 3

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Sociology of Human Animal Relations SOCY30041 20 Optional
Urban Sociology SOCY30061 20 Optional
Reproduction & New Medical Technologies SOCY30072 20 Optional
Forced Migration SOCY30082 20 Optional
Changing Social Attitudes SOCY30092 20 Optional
Post-Colonial Theory & Politics SOCY30112 20 Optional
Sociology of the Body SOCY30141 20 Optional
Secrets, Lies & Mass Deception SOCY30151 20 Optional
Identity, Power & Modernity SOCY30171 20 Optional
Multicultural Britain SOCY30272 20 Optional
Applications of Social Networks SOCY30292 20 Optional
Power and Protest SOCY30461 20 Optional
The Sociology of Family Life and Intimacy SOCY30842 20 Optional
Dissertation (20 credits) SOCY30920 20 Optional
Dissertation B (40 credits) SOCY30930 40 Optional
Gender, Time and Change SOCY30981 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 16 course units for year 3

What our students say

'Sociology at Manchester is engaging, thought-provoking and exciting.'

Amy Ibister , BSocSc Sociology student.

'The Professional Development for Sociologists (PRoD) sessions in my course are really useful especially when it comes to planning for my future career.

From these sessions I've learnt more about what to do with my sociology degree and how to prepare my profile. As a result of this, I started looking around for part-time jobs, internship and volunteering opportunities to improve my CV.'

Sherita Tam , Sociology student.

  • 96% of students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and make the subject interesting (Source: Unistats)

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

BSocSc Sociology features a course on Professional Development for Sociologists (ProD) that runs across all three years of the degree.

The course involves lectures, workshops, panels and other activities all designed to help with your studies and equip you for the world of work.

Academic skills courses include:

  • training in critical reading and writing;
  • essay and exam techniques;
  • presentation skills;
  • preparing dissertations.

Careers skills courses include:

  • regular events on jobs, careers and employability;
  • volunteering and internship opportunities;
  • opportunities to meet alumni from the Sociology department, graduate employers, Careers Service advisers and other experts at the University.

A degree in Sociology gives you the skills and knowledge that you need to able to succeed in the future. Graduates from Sociology are highly sought after and are able to use their skills and knowledge in a wide range of different areas.

Our graduates have been employed by:

Amazon, Armstrong Craven, AstraZeneca, Barclays investment Bank, BBC, Boots, British Heart Foundation, British Red Cross, BT, Cambridge University Library, Credit Suisse, Discovery Channel, Family Mediation Forum, Financial Times, KPMG, Manchester United Football Club, Marks & Spencer, Microsoft, NHS, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ralph Lauren, Royal Bank of Scotland, Royal Exchange Theatre, Sky, Standard Chartered Bank, Teach First, The Co-operative Group, The Guardian, The Open University, UBS, United Nations and the World Bank, Department for Work and Pensions, Manchester City Council, Social Services, Royal Bank of Scotland. (Source: DLHE.)

See also

Throughout your studies and after you graduate you will have to access our Careers Service , which can help you:

  • find summer internships or work experience;
  • apply for jobs and provide practice interviews;
  • access online and interactive services such as practice psychometric tests.

Our students can also apply for a valuable summer work placement in their second year through our Q-Step programme.

A favourite with employers, the University also organises careers fairs and events throughout the year to give you a chance to meet graduate recruiters.