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School of Social Sciences

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BSocSc Sociology
Learn to critically analyse and interpret societies and gain skills for a variety of careers.

BSocSc Sociology

Year of entry: 2018

Course unit details:
Researching Culture and Society

Unit code SOCY10440
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 1
Teaching period(s) Full year
Offered by Sociology
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

 

 
After completing the course students should:
be familiar with the epistemological assumptions underpinning quantitative and qualitative methods;
be able to demonstrate their knowledge of a variety of methodological frameworks and research methods; 
be able to choose appropriate method of research with respect to research objectives; 
have furthered their ability to reflect upon their experience in writing assignments

Aims

How do we generate and evaluate social research? This course examines the process and practices of sociological knowledge production, and explores what is distinctive about sociological approaches to understanding and researching social life. The module provides a foundation for the study of sociology by introducing the core issues of sociological method and research which underpin many of the sociology courses, and readings, student will subsequently encounter. It also provides research and study skills of relevance to sociology as a discipline and skills of wider relevance to academic study in general. These skills will allow students to develop their potential during their studies, and will provide an awareness of sociology as a research discipline.

- To introduce students to the major methodological debates within social sciences;
- To outline the relationship between theory and methods of research and analysis;
- To equip students with the skills necessary to critically evaluate the merits of different theoretical and methodological approaches;
- To familiarise students with the ethical and political issues involved in social research;
- To develop student's written and oral skills.

Learning outcomes

After completing the course students should:
- be familiar with the epistemological assumptions underpinning quantitative and qualitative methods;
- be able to demonstrate their knowledge of a variety of methodological frameworks and research methods;
- be able to choose appropriate method of research with respect to research objectives;
- have furthered their ability to reflect upon their experience in writing assignments

Teaching and learning methods

Weekly one hour lectures
Weekly one hour tutorial

Assessment methods

One assessed and one non-assessed portfolio in semester 1 (50%). One assessed and one non-assessed assignment in semester 2 (50%).

Feedback methods

All sociology courses include both formative feedback – which lets you know how you’re getting on and what you could do to improve – and summative feedback – which gives you a mark for your assessed work.

Recommended reading

Karen Evans and Dave King (2006) Studying Society: the essentials
Jonathan Grix (2004) The Foundations of Research
Malcolm Williams and Tim May (1996) Introduction to the Philosophy of Social Research
Alan Bryman (2001) Social Research Methods
Tim May (2001) Social Research

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 20
Tutorials 20
Independent study hours
Independent study 160

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Martyn Hyde Unit coordinator

Additional notes

2015/15 timetable

Monday 14:00 - 16:00, plus a separate one-hour tutorial (range of times available)

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