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School of Social Sciences

Student in the Alan Gilbert Learning Commons
BSocSc Politics and International Relations
Gain the skills to critical examine international and comparative politics.

BSocSc Politics and International Relations

Year of entry: 2018

Course unit details:
The Politics of Policy Making

Unit code POLI20802
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 2
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by Politics
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

Public policies have far reaching consequences for citizens ranging from the restriction of liberty to the provision of free school meals.  Ministers cannot directly arrest criminals, provide health care to patients or teach this module.  Governments need policy interventions to act.  Policy is the means by which politics is connected to government activity in the real world.

Studying public policy raises some controversial questions and issues.  For example, who really has the power in policy-making?  Who sets the policy agenda, and how?  Should citizens be involved in decisions, and how can we stop the loudest voices from dominating?

Are Government policies decided on the basis of evidence? Why do some policies go so disastrously wrong? Are Government Ministers as in charge as they like to believe, or are they actually the puppets of the bureaucrats? What are the effects on peoples’ lives of the workers delivering policy on the ground, like care workers, policy officers, doctors receptionists? 

These are some of the exciting questions we will discuss in this module. Previous students have rated this module highly, with comments including

“Unbelievably enthusiastic, helpful and kind. Put so much effort into everything, organized the course very well and overall was there to help with anything.”

“the tutorials really helped my learning, [the tutor] managed to encourage everyone to participate and that was really helpful”

“valued greatly the breadth of topics within this module and the opportunity to bridge many gaps between theory and the real world”

The main rule for this module is that students put the effort in and work hard. You snooze; you lose.  So be warned!  And prepared to attend 9am lectures. If you fancy an easy life and like sleeping in, this is not the module for you.

The main aim of the course is to provide conceptual and empirical insights into the development and implementation of public policy.  In teaching, we blend theories with practical examples.  The lectures offer UK examples and contemporary ‘real-life’ case studies from British politics.  However, the theories are applicable in other advanced industrial democracies, and we very much welcome examples from other places in the world. In previous years, students have used examples from Hong Kong, China, the USA, Brazil, France and other places.

The tutorials are very interactive, and participatory.  We hate tutorials where everyone sits in silence looking uncomfortable and the same person speaks week after week.  We use unusual techniques to make sure everyone can contribute equally, in a fun atmosphere, while stretching ourselves intellectually.

The convenor and tutorial teacher want students to do well, and will respond constructively to emails, and offer tailored support, and comments. We want students to develop their own creative ideas.

Where possible, we have outside speakers tell us about ‘behind the scenes’ policy-making.  We also try and offer work experience opportunities (unpaid) where we can get them.

It is suitable for students across a range of degrees, including joint degrees with politics, such as PPE, BASS, Law with Politics, Politics and Modern History, as well as students from criminology and sociology.

Pre/co-requisites

The ability to get up for 9am lectures, a commitment to working hard, original ideas.

Aims

This course will aim to provide students with conceptual and empirical insights into the development and implementation of public policies.  On completion students should possess an understanding of models of policy making and implementation and be able to apply this understanding to contemporary policy examples from the UK, and elsewhere in the world.    Case studies will be examined and will include examples from current policy agendas.

Learning outcomes

On completion of the course unit, students should be able to

- Demonstrate a critical awareness of the role of concepts and theories applicable to the study of public policy making;

- Apply relevant concepts and theories to substantive case material drawn from the field of public policy.

- Use electronic resources to identify relevant empirical material, summarise key ideas and concepts both in writing and verbally, and work in small groups

Teaching and learning methods

Weekly 2 hour lectures and weekly 1 hour workshops/tutorials

Assessment methods

Assessment will be by:

- one assessed essay of 2,000 words, worth 30% of the final mark;

- Submission of a learning log (1,000 words) linked to the 10 tutorials (tasks as specified in topic guide and through blackboard updates) worth 10% of the final mark

- a two hour exam answering two questions, worth 60% of the final mark

Feedback methods

We offer feedback before submission on plans, drafts, or  ideas. We do this by email, on the phone, in drop-in sessions, and comments on written documents.  Students then also receive feedback on their marks (within 15 working days of the hand-in) through Turnitin as usual, or comments on exams.

Politics staff will provide feedback on written work within 15 working days of submission via Blackboard (if submitted through Turnitin).

Students should be aware that all marks are provisional until confirmed by the external examiner and the final examinations boards in June.

For modules that do not have examination components the marks and feedback for the final assessed component are not subject to the 15 working day rule and will be released with the examination results. This applies to Semester 2 modules only. Semester one modules with no final examination will have their feedback available within the 15 working days.

You will receive feedback on assessed essays in a standard format. This will rate your essay in terms of various aspects of the argument that you have presented your use of sources and the quality of the style and presentation of the essay. If you have any queries about the feedback that you have received you should make an appointment to see your tutor. Tutors and Course Convenors also have a dedicated office hour when you can meet with her/him to discuss course unit specific problems and questions.

On assessments submitted through Turnitin you will receive feedback via Blackboard. This will include suggestions about ways in which you could improve your work in future. You will also receive feedback on non-assessed coursework, whether this is individual or group work. This may be of a more informal kind and may include feedback from peers as well as academic staff

Recommended reading

Cairney, Paul. (2012) Understanding Public Policy, Houndmills, Palgrave, and
Knill, Christoph and Tonsun, Jale. (2012) Public Policy A New Introduction, Houndmills, Palgrave

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Assessment written exam 2
Lectures 20
Tutorials 10
Independent study hours
Independent study 168

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Elizabeth Richardson Unit coordinator

Additional notes

Information
Length of course: 12 weeks

 

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