Search
Search type

School of Social Sciences

Students outside a lecture theatre at The University of Manchester
BAEcon Economics
Learn how the social sciences can help you to understand today's world.

BAEcon Economics

Year of entry: 2018

Course unit details:
Global Migration

Unit code SOCY20271
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 2
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by Sociology
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

 

The unit aims to:

 

  • To understand key concepts in migration, the causes and consequences of migration, national and international responses to migration and the diversity of migrant flows within a global context.  

 

  • To critically evaluate the theoretical perspectives informing the sociology of migration alongside the inter-disciplinary aspects of research and scholarship in the area of Migration Studies. 

 

To understand how and why migration has changed, including the growth in irregular migration, the feminisation of migration and the transnational turn in migration studies. 

Aims

 

The unit aims to:

 

  • To understand key concepts in migration, the causes and consequences of migration, national and international responses to migration and the diversity of migrant flows within a global context.  

 

  • To critically evaluate the theoretical perspectives informing the sociology of migration alongside the inter-disciplinary aspects of research and scholarship in the area of Migration Studies. 

 

To understand how and why migration has changed, including the growth in irregular migration, the feminisation of migration and the transnational turn in migration studies. 

Learning outcomes

 

Student should be able to:

 

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key concepts in migration studies, the main theoretical paradigms and the causes and consequences of global migration.

 

  • Develop the ability to critically evaluate theoretical ideas and supranational and national policies relating to global migration.

 

  • To synthesis, summarise and critically evaluate information from a range of sources including academic and grey literature in order to produce assessed coursework. 

 

Acquire and demonstrate transferable skills through group work and debates. 

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written exam 50%
Written assignment (inc essay) 50%

Feedback methods

Formative assessment: Students will write a short review bibliography, of 1000 words, that critically evaluates and summarises the main arguments of four journal articles and/or book chapters that are relevant to their assessed essay.  The aim is to begin to prepare students for their essay and ensure that they start to critically engage with the relevant literature. Although this is non-assessed it is still compulsory and non-submission will be penalised with a deduction of 5%.

Recommended reading

 

Boswell, C. and Geddes (2011) Migration and Mobility in the European Union, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Brettell, C. and Hollifield, J. (eds.) (2007) Migration Theory: Talking across disciplines, New York: Routledge, 2nd Edition.

Castles, S. (2007) ‘Twenty-First-Century Migration as a Challenge to Sociology’, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 33, No. 3, pp. 351-371

Castles, S & Miller, R (2009) The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan (4th edition).

Koser K. (2007) International Migration, a very short introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press

Massey, D. S., Arango, J., Hugo, G., Kouaouci, A., Pellegrino, A. and Taylor, J.E. (2005) Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium, Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 30
Independent study hours
Independent study 170

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Alice Bloch Unit coordinator

Additional notes

2015/15 timetable

Friday 14:00 - 17:00

Return to course details