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School of Social Sciences

Students outside a lecture theatre at The University of Manchester
BAEcon Economics
Learn how the social sciences can help you to understand today's world.

BAEcon Economics

Year of entry: 2018

Course unit details:
Foundations of Social Thought

Unit code SOCY10421
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 1
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by Sociology
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

This course will provide a basic but comprehensive introduction to some of the intellectual traditions within sociology with a focus on the origins of the discipline. The course will provide the student with the necessary conceptual tools to understand the distinctive origin and nature of sociology as an academic discipline and as a wider cultural presence within modernity. In all cases emphasis will be placed upon the specific historical context of particular writers and theories. It will be argued that the emergence of sociology and the social sciences in general represents an intellectual response to the cultural and material problems of capitalist industrial societies in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The course will equip students with the concepts and information necessary to grasp the main themes of the classical sociological tradition.

Aims

This course will provide a basic but comprehensive introduction to some of the intellectual traditions within sociology with a focus on the origins of the discipline. The course will provide the student with the necessary conceptual tools to understand the distinctive origin and nature of sociology as an academic discipline and as a wider cultural presence within modernity. In all cases emphasis will be placed upon the specific historical context of particular writers and theories. It will be argued that the emergence of sociology and the social sciences in general represents an intellectual response to the cultural and material problems of capitalist industrial societies in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The course will equip students with the concepts and information necessary to grasp the main themes of the classical sociological tradition. The objectives of the course are to provide students with some basic conceptual resources for tackling substantive and theoretical material in their 2nd and 3rd years.

Learning outcomes

The objectives of the course are to provide students with some basic conceptual resources for tackling substantive and theoretical material in their 2nd and 3rd years

Teaching and learning methods

Weekly lecture
Fortnightly tutorials

Assessment methods

Two compulsory non-assessed tutorial assignments (5% deducted from final mark for each non-completed assignment). Final mark derived from 2 hour examination. Examination in January.

Feedback methods

All sociology courses include both formative feedback – which lets you know how you’re getting on and what you could do to improve – and summative feedback – which gives you a mark for your assessed work.

Recommended reading

K. Morrison
Marx, Durkheim Weber

A. Giddens
Capitalism and Modern Social Theory

I. McIntosh (ed)
Classical Sociological Theory

J. Hughes, P.Martin & W.Sharrock
Understanding Classical Sociology

I. Craib
Classical Social Theory

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Assessment written exam 2
Lectures 20
Tutorials 10
Independent study hours
Independent study 168

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Peter McMylor Unit coordinator

Additional notes

2016/17 timetable

Friday 13:00 - 15:00, plus a separate one-hour tutorial (range of times available)

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