Search
Search type

School of Social Sciences

Students outside a lecture theatre at The University of Manchester
BAEcon Economics
Learn how the social sciences can help you to understand today's world.

BAEcon Economics

Year of entry: 2018

Course unit details:
Gender, War & Militarism

Unit code POLI30791
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 3
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by Politics
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

Week 1 – Introduction to the Course

PART I: Conceptual Framework

Week 2 – What is gender?

Week 3 – What is war? What is militarism?

PART II: What is the relationship between gender, war and militarism?

Week 4 – Where are the Women?

Week 5 – Where are the Men?

 Part III: Rethinking the relationship between gender, war and militarism beyond the binary

Week 6 – Queering Violence in War

Week 7 – Cyborg soldiers and new (gender) bodily configurations

Week 8 – Gender and Emotions in War/Militarism

Week 9 – Group Poster Presentations

Week 10 – R esisting gender, resisting war and militarism?

Pre/co-requisites

This course is ONLY OPEN to students from the following degree programmes: BSocSci, BA (Econ) Politics Specialists (including development studies), PMH, Phil/Pol, Law with Politics, PPE, BASS

Aims

This course explores the complex relatonship between gender, war and militarism in international politics. Beginning with an understanding of gender as constitutive, the course will examine how gendered representations are central logics in practices of violence; how war and militarism produce gender in a variety of competing and conflicting ways; and also how war and militarism produce a range of gendered affects and effects. The course will develop a deep and critical engagement with the three central categories of analysis in the course – gender, militarism and war – requiring that we ‘disturb’ what we think we know about each of these practices and how we understand all three, both individually and as intertwined practices. The course will also critically explore other categories of analysis such as race and sexuality to further complicate the relationship between subjectivity and violence at work at the interstices of the core concepts.

Some of the questions the course will explore are: What is gender? How does it work with other differences? What is its relationship to violence? What is the relationship between subjectivity and violence? What is war? What is militarism? Where and when are they taking place? Who does war? Who does militarism? How are these gendered? What, if any, are alternatives to militarism and war? How does this involve (or not) gender?

The objective of this course is to sensitise students to gender as a relation of power that both constitutes militarism and war and also acts as a profound limit to how we might otherwise engage global politics. The course encourages both a reconceptualisation “gender”, “war” and “miltiarism”, and a broadening of the nature of "international politics" and what we deem “international” and "political”. The course takes seriously how gender produces who we are (subjectivities), how we think and act in the world, and how thinking about gender is crucial to rethinking the so-called “realities”of war and militarism.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to:

 Knowledge and understanding of the subject:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the complex relationship between gender, war and militarism;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of feminist approaches to the study of war and militarism in relation to both mainstream and critical approaches;
  • Outline and discuss how criticially engaging with gender is significant to international politics;
  • Demonstrate an ability to think critically about feminism and the gendered politics of violence in international politics;
  • Evaluate different interpretations of the complex relationship between these three core concepts;
  • Articulate their own views on gender, war and militarism with recourse to (and sometimes rejection of) both the literature covered in the course and literature and information gathered for the research essay.

Teaching and learning methods

 A variety of learning methods are used in the course, which include:

  • Lectures and seminars;
  • Whole group, small group and individual teaching and learning;
  • Student-led and tutor-led sessions
  • Skills-based, discussion-based and knowledge-based classes.

Teaching and learning methods are designed to:

  • Meet the aims and objectives of the course and degree programme;
  • Foster knowledge and enthusiaism for the subject;
  • Stimulate engagement and ownership of the learning process;
  • Encourage deep learning by students;
  • Develop a strong knowledge base of the course through a wide range of methods including critical reading of a wide range of texts;
  • Foster independent research using both priamry and secondary sources;
  • Enable seminar-based discussion for communicating ideas and presenting ideas in a variety of formats;
  • Take proactive account of the different circumstances and needs of students, facilitating wider participation.

Knowledge and understanding

 Knowledge and understanding of the subject:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the complex relationship between gender, war and militarism;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of feminist approaches to the study of war and militarism in relation to both mainstream and critical approaches;
  • Outline and discuss how criticially engaging with gender is significant to international politics;
  • Demonstrate an ability to think critically about feminism and the gendered politics of violence in international politics;
  • Evaluate different interpretations of the complex relationship between these three core concepts;
  • Articulate their own views on gender, war and militarism with recourse to (and sometimes rejection of) both the literature covered in the course and literature and information gathered for the research essay.

Intellectual skills

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to

Intellectual and Transferable Skills:

  • Gather, organise and deploy analytical evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources;
  • Construct reasoned argument, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement;
  • Reflect on their own learning and seek and make use of constructive feedback;
  • Critically analyse and disseminate information;
  • Manage their own learning self-critically;
  • Recognise the importance of explicit referencing and the ethical requirements of study, in particular critical and reflective use of information and communications technology in the learning process;
  • Communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing. *Employers require Politics and International Relations graduates to be able to communicate ideas effectively to a varied audience. This ability to translate complex ideas to a wide audience is a particularly valued skill;
  • Use communication and information technology, including audiovisual technology, for the retreival and presentation of information;
  • Progress through the degree programme to become mature, independent learners who can demonstrate initiative, self-organisation and time management attributes. The ability to identify opportunites for continuous learning and development, leading to future continuous professional development, is particularly valued by employers;
  • Collaborate with others to achieve commom goals through, for example group work, group projects, group presentations. Employers regard collaboration and the indentification of common goals highly.

Transferable skills and personal qualities

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to

 Intellectual and Transferable Skills:

  • Gather, organise and deploy analytical evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources;
  • Construct reasoned argument, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement;
  • Reflect on their own learning and seek and make use of constructive feedback;
  • Critically analyse and disseminate information;
  • Manage their own learning self-critically;
  • Recognise the importance of explicit referencing and the ethical requirements of study, in particular critical and reflective use of information and communications technology in the learning process;
  • Communicate effectively and fluently in speech and writing. *Employers require Politics and International Relations graduates to be able to communicate ideas effectively to a varied audience. This ability to translate complex ideas to a wide audience is a particularly valued skill;
  • Use communication and information technology, including audiovisual technology, for the retreival and presentation of information;
  • Progress through the degree programme to become mature, independent learners who can demonstrate initiative, self-organisation and time management attributes. The ability to identify opportunites for continuous learning and development, leading to future continuous professional development, is particularly valued by employers;
  • Collaborate with others to achieve commom goals through, for example group work, group projects, group presentations. Employers regard collaboration and the indentification of common goals highly.

Assessment methods

Research Essay 60%
Group Poster Presentation 20%
Critical Reading Summaries 20%

Feedback methods

 

Politics staff will provide feedback on written work within 15 working days of submission.

Students should be aware that all marks are provisional until confirmed by the external examiner and the final examinations boards in June.

For modules that do not have examination components the marks and feedback for the final assessed component are not subject to the 15 working day rule and will be released with the examination results.

You will receive feedback on assessed essays in a standard format. This will rate your essay in terms of various aspects of the argument that you have presented your use of sources and the quality of the style and presentation of the essay. If you have any queries about the feedback that you have received you should make an appointment to see your tutor.

On assessments submitted through Turnitin you will receive feedback via Blackboard. This will include suggestions about ways in which you could improve your work in future. You will also receive feedback on non-assessed coursework, whether this is individual or group work. This may be of a more informal kind and may include feedback from peers as well as academic staff

Recommended reading

 

Ackerly, Brooke A., Maria Stern, and Jacqui True, eds., Feminist Methodologies for International Relations (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).
Cohn, Carol, ed., Women & Wars (Polity Press, 2013).

Enloe, Cynthia, Bananas, Beaches and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics, 2nd edition (London: University of California Press, 2014).

Kronswell, Annica & Erica Svedberg, eds., Making Gender, Making War: Violence, Military and Peacekeeping Practices (London: Routledge, 2013).

Parpart, Jane L., and Marysia Zalewski, Rethinking the Man Question: Sex, Gender and Violence in International Relations (London: Zed Books, 2008).

Shepherd, Laura, Gender, Violence & Popular Culture: Telling Stories (London: Routledge, 2013).

Sjoberg, Laura, Gender, War & Conflict (London: Polity Press, 2014).

Sjoberg, Laura & Sandra Via, eds., Gender, War & Militarism: Feminist Perspectives (Praeger, 2010).

Steans, Jill, Gender and International Relations: An Introduction, 3rd Edition (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2013).

Weber, Cynthia, Imagining America at War: Morality, Politics, and Film (London: Routledge, 2006).

Zalewski, Marysia, Feminist International Relations: Exquisite Corpse (London: Routledge, 2013).

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 10
Seminars 20
Independent study hours
Independent study 170

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Cristina Masters Unit coordinator

Additional notes

Length of Course: 12 weeks

 

Return to course details