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School of Social Sciences

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BAEcon Economics
Learn how the social sciences can help you to understand today's world.

BAEcon Economics

Year of entry: 2018

Course unit details:
Arguing About Politics: Political Theory in the World

Unit code POLI20602
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 2
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by Politics
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

The course will cover a variety of approaches to, and applications of, political argument and their real world applications. The topics selected change from year to year and are chosen as the special topics of research of the staff teaching on the course that year. In previous years the issues covered were 'The Problem of Dirty Hands'. ‘Designer Babies’, ‘The Ethics of Voting’, ‘Punishment’ and ‘Terrorism’. Students will be taught in lectures and tutorials by a lecturer who is or recently has been conducting research on the topic they are teaching. The course offers a real insight into cutting-edge research and how political theory arguments apply to the real world.

Pre/co-requisites

Unit title Unit code Requirement type Description
Introduction to Political Theory POLI10702 Pre-Requisite Compulsory
Ideals of Social Justice POLI20881 Pre-Requisite Compulsory
Challenges for Democratic Politics POLI20961 Pre-Requisite Compulsory

Please note that you only need to have met ONE of the above pre-requisities to take POLI20602

Aims

This course will introduce students to a selection of recent work in political theory with particular focus on how these theoretical debates apply to current political controversies. Theoretical arguments about (among other topics) the interface between morality and politics, the nature of toleration, freedom of expression, group rights, and global justice will be applied to practical political problems.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit successful students will:
Have gained a deeper understanding of certain key normative debates in politics

Be able to apply theoretical arguments about abstract concepts to practical political controversies Be able to analyse normative arguments critically

Be able to construct and defend their own normative arguments in an analytically rigorous fashion

Teaching and learning methods

Tutorials are taken by the lecturers who lecture that week.

Assessment methods

 

One 2-hour exam: 60%
One 2600-word essay: 40%

Feedback methods

Politics staff will provide feedback on written work within 15 working days of submission via Blackboard (if submitted through Turnitin).

Students should be aware that all marks are provisional until confirmed by the external examiner and the final examinations boards in June.

For modules that do not have examination components the marks and feedback for the final assessed component are not subject to the 15 working day rule and will be released with the examination results. This applies to Semester 2 modules only. Semester one modules with no final examination will have their feedback available within the 15 working days.

You will receive feedback on assessed essays in a standard format. This will rate your essay in terms of various aspects of the argument that you have presented your use of sources and the quality of the style and presentation of the essay. If you have any queries about the feedback that you have received you should make an appointment to see your tutor. Tutors and Course Convenors also have a dedicated office hour when you can meet with her/him to discuss course unit specific problems and questions.

On assessments submitted through Turnitin you will receive feedback via Blackboard. This will include suggestions about ways in which you could improve your work in future. You will also receive feedback on non-assessed coursework, whether this is individual or group work. This may be of a more informal kind and may include feedback from peers as well as academic staff

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Assessment written exam 2
Lectures 20
Seminars 10
Independent study hours
Independent study 168

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Liam Shields Unit coordinator

Additional notes

Information
Information
POLI 10702 (Introduction to Political Thought) is a pre-requisite. 

 

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