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School of Social Sciences

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BAEcon Economics
Learn how the social sciences can help you to understand today's world.

BAEcon Economics / Course details

Year of entry: 2018

Course unit details:
War Memories and Reconciliation in East Asia

Unit code POLI31011
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 3
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by Politics
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Aims

 

The unit aims to:

  • Introduce students to the various controversies surrounding war memories in East Asia, and how it affects interstate relations in the region. ¿
  • Foster students’ ability to the relations between war memories and international politics in a theoretically-informed manner. ¿
  • Develop students’ ability to apply some basic theoretical concepts on reconciliation critically to empirical cases. ¿
  • Provoke students’ thinking on practical steps needed to overcome the negative effects of war memories, both in East Asia and beyond.

Learning outcomes

 

Student should be able to

 

  • A broad understanding of the political developments of war memory in East Asia, as well as attempts to overcome the legacy of war in the region.
  • Analytical skills: an ability to develop arguments which synthesise theoretical and empirical material.
  • Communication skills: ability to effectively articulate coherent, critically-informed arguments and ideas to a small and larger groups; ability to interact with colleagues in a constructive manner.
  • Writing skills: an ability to express concise, logical arguments in written form.

Syllabus

 

Content:

 

  1. Introduction
  2. Historical Background: the origins of ‘contested history’ in East Asia (video presentation)
  3. Memory in International Politics: Does it Matter?
  4. Historical Memories and Nationalism in China
  5. Historical Memories and Nationalism in Japan
  6. Contested Memories
  7. Reconciliation: How can it be achieved?
  8. Case Study of Reconciliation I: The ‘Comfort Women’ Issue
  9. Case Study of Reconciliation II: Joint History Writing
  10. Historical Memory and Reconciliation in Comparative Perspective: what can East Asia and the Rest learn from each other?

Assessment methods

One 1500 word Essay worth 25 %

One 4500 word Essay worth 75%

 

Feedback methods

Politics staff will provide feedback on written work within 15 working days of submission via Blackboard (if submitted through Turnitin).

Students should be aware that all marks are provisional until confirmed by the external examiner and the final examinations boards in June.

For modules that do not have examination components the marks and feedback for the final assessed component are not subject to the 15 working day rule and will be released with the examination results. This applies to Semester 2 modules only. Semester one modules with no final examination will have their feedback available within the 15 working days.

You will receive feedback on assessed essays in a standard format. This will rate your essay in terms of various aspects of the argument that you have presented your use of sources and the quality of the style and presentation of the essay. If you have any queries about the feedback that you have received you should make an appointment to see your tutor. Tutors and Course Convenors also have a dedicated office hour when you can meet with her/him to discuss course unit specific problems and questions.

On assessments submitted through Turnitin you will receive feedback via Blackboard. This will include suggestions about ways in which you could improve your work in future. You will also receive feedback on non-assessed coursework, whether this is individual or group work. This may be of a more informal kind and may include feedback from peers as well as academic staff

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 20
Seminars 10
Independent study hours
Independent study 170

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Shogo Suzuki Unit coordinator

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